Sociology, BMS

Bachelor of Multidisciplinary Studies Degree with a Concentration in Sociology

University of Nebraska at Omaha

  • Fully Online
  • 120
    Credits
  • $259.00
    In-State
  • $452.00
    Out-of-State

Program Overview

The online Bachelor of Multidisciplinary Studies degree (BMS) with an area of concentration in Sociology prepares adult students for academic advancement and professional careers. Students receive a liberal arts education, highly valued in today's workplace for developing critical thinking and decision-making skills.

The sociology concentration provides:

  • Exploration into how people structure social life and the consequences of those structures for human behavior.
  • Students can explore areas such as families, health, social organization, and social inequality.
  • Development of skills useful in a variety of settings.

Sociology is a versatile concentration and helps develop skills and understanding useful in a variety of settings. Students can explore areas such as: 

  • Families
  • Experiences of racial and ethnic groups
  • Media
  • Organizations
  • Social inequality
  • Women and feminism
  • Sexuality
  • Corporate culture
  • Human emotions
  • Welfare or education reform
  • Human rights
  • Issues regarding peace and war 

A foundational education in sociology also prepares students for pursuing advanced degrees.

Graduates are prepared for careers in a wide range of fields, including: 

  • Human/social services
  • Government or nonprofit organizations
  • Criminal justice
  • Education
  • Research
  • Human resources
  • Customer service
  • Business management
  • Public relations
  • Politics
  • Marketing
  • Counseling

More about the Bachelor of Multidisciplinary Studies Degree (BMS): Nationally ranked as one of the top bachelor's programs in the United States from U.S. News and World Report, the Bachelor of Multidisciplinary Studies degree (BMS) is a flexible, individualized degree program. In determining these rankings, U.S. News assesses programs on four general categories: student engagement; faculty credentials and training; student services and technology; and peer reputation.

The adaptable nature of the program provides students with the opportunity to design a personalized degree tailored to meet individual career goals, satisfy personal aspirations or prepare for graduate studies. This online degree program accepts transfer credit from all regionally accredited colleges and universities, as well as non-traditional credit from formal training experiences that have been evaluated and approved by specific agencies and committees.

Admissions and Requirements

To be accepted to this program, you must have:

  1. Taken the SAT or ACT

  2. Taken the TOEFL or IELTS

    (Only required if English is not your native language)

  3. Official transcripts from all previous schools

  4. Be at least 21 years old or active duty military personnel

  5. Have earned a high school diploma or GED

NOTE: This program is authorized, exempt, or not subject to state regulatory compliance and may enroll students from all 50 states

To apply to this program:

  1. Complete and submit the online application for admissions
  2. Pay the $45 non-refundable application fee

Courses You’ll Take

Course Information

Students must complete at least 30 credit hours in their area of concentration. In addition, students must also complete two secondary fields, each consisting of 12 credit hours from the same subject.

Core Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
SOC 4990Independent Study3
Guided readings or independent research in special topics under the supervision of a faculty member. A formal contract specifying the nature of the work to be completed must be signed before registering for the course. SOC 4990 may be taken for a maximum of six hours.
SOC 3900Race & Ethnic Relations in the U.S.3
The course explores historical and contemporary meanings of race and ethnicity and introduces students to the ways sociologists think about race, race relations and racism. It reviews current theoretical issues, and focuses on the recent histories and current position of several major racial-ethnic populations in the U.S.: African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Emphasis is on how race has structured groups' experiences in relation to social institutions like health, education, culture and media, legal system, and the economy.  Prereq: Six hours of social science.
SOC 4800Contemporary Topics in Sociology3
This course reviews research and writing in an area which is of current interest in the field of sociology. The specific topic(s) to be covered will be announced at the time the course is being offered. Since the topic will vary, students may elect to take this course more than once.
SOC 3690Social Stratification3
Considers the inequalities of social class, power and status and their relationships to race, ethnicity and gender in order to determine who gets what and why. The consequences of social stratification for life chances, consumption and social mobility are examined.  Prereq: SOC 1010 and sophomore standing.
SOC 4130Sociology of Deviant Behavior3
The course explores historical and contemporary meanings of race and ethnicity and introduces students to the ways sociologists think about race, race relations and racism. It reviews current theoretical issues, and focuses on the recent histories and current position of several major racial-ethnic populations in the U.S.: African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Emphasis is on how race has structured groups' experiences in relation to social institutions like health, education, culture and media, legal system, and the economy.  Prereq: Six hours of social science
SOC 3450Social Psychology3
Social interaction studied in situations of (1) social influences on individuals, (2) dyads or face-to-face groups, and (3) larger social systems. The concepts, theories, data, research methods, and applications of varied substantive topics are examined.  Prereq: SOC 1010 or PSYC 1010
SOC 2800Major Social Issues3
The course examines a major social issue with readings and required materials designed for non-majors. The specific topic will vary from semester to semester. Students may take the course more than once. Prereq: SOC 1010
SOC 1010Introduction to Sociology3
An introduction to the study of human societies. The course presents the fundamental concepts and theories that make up the sociological perspective. These serve as tools for the analysis of social inequality, social institutions and social change.
SOC 2100Social Problems3
An analysis of the origins of social problems in American society. Attention is given to the nature, consequences and solutions of selected social problems.  Prereq: Three hours of social science.
SOC 4150American Family Problems3
This course takes up problems and issues of the contemporary American family. Specific topics vary, but might include: family violence; the impact of poverty and racism on families; families and work; gender roles; divorce and its aftermath; remarriage and step-parenthood; family and economy; law and the family; parenting; sexuality, sexual orientation, and reproduction; family policy; drug, alcohol, and mental health problems; and the most basic question of all: what is a family? Family problems and issues are presented in an historical and analytical context which connects the family to basic social institutions and processes.  Prereq: SOC 1010 or 2150
SOC 2130Social Statistics3
Descriptive statistics techniques and the principles of inferential statistical thinking. The emphasis is on the basic statistical techniques employed in analysis of social data. This course does not count as social science credit.  Prereq: MATH 1310

Tuition & Fees

Nebraska Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$259.00
Fees
$52.25
Total
$311.25

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$777.00
Fees
$156.75
Total
$933.75

Out of State Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$452.00
Fees
$52.25
Total
$504.25

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$1356.00
Fees
$156.75
Total
$1512.75
About Faculty

University of Nebraska online courses are taught by expert faculty who embody the qualities resulting from research experience and professional/field experience. Students learn from faculty with a variety of backgrounds, many of whom are published researchers in their fields. NU faculty who teach online do so in a way that optimizes learning within the online modality and because technology enables students to access education they may otherwise may not be able to pursue.

Application Deadlines
  • Fall SemesterAug 01
  • Spring SemesterDec 01
  • Summer SessionsJun 01
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