Sociology, BA or BS

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology or Bachelor of Science in Sociology

University of Nebraska at Omaha

  • Fully Online
  • 120
    Credits
  • $259.00
    In-State
  • $452.00
    Out-of-State

Program Overview

This online Sociology bachelor's degree program provides the analytical skills needed to understand the challenges of a rapidly changing and increasingly diverse world. You'll discover that sociology and anthropology have a distinct perspective on social inequality, patterns of behavior, culture and social change.

Graduates acquire the tools necessary to improve our societies at all levels from the neighborhood to the world community. Whether you are interested in advancing within your career or changing careers, sociology and anthropology courses will help you develop the practical skills employers want.

Practical skills gained through this program include:

  • Learn to interpret and analyze data
  • Design and conduct a research project
  • Improve written communication and presentation skills
  • Solve problems and identify solutions
  • Navigate issues of global diversity

Careers you will be qualified for:

  • Family and Social Services Program Support Specialist
  • Business Management and Leadership
  • Marketing Analysis and Research
  • Survey Research Analyst
  • Health and Human Services Advocate
  • Health Care Administration
  • Nonprofit Organizational Administration

Health and Society Concentration

The Health and Society concentration allows students to focus their degree in Sociology on contemporary issues in health and illness, health care organizations, public health policies and health inequalities.

The courses offered in this area may be of interest to students seeking careers in the medical and health-related fields as they provide students with a broader understanding of health care policy, interactions in the healthcare setting, the experience of illness, the provision of care, health disparities and particular patient populations.

What is Sociology?

Sociology is the scientific study of human relationships. Sociologists seek to understand the ways that often unseen social forces shape our lives. Sociologists have broad interests ranging from families, racial and ethnic identity, organizations, social inequality, sex and gender, sexuality, the welfare system, education reform, human rights, to peace and war. Sociology has a distinct perspective on social inequality, patterns of behavior, forces for social change and resistance, and how social systems work. A degree in Sociology provides a well-rounded liberal arts education that emphasizes:

  • Critical thinking
  • Decision-making skills
  • The ability to make connections across disciplines.

Study Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha draws from the research and teaching expertise of 15 full-time faculty. They have interested in health, work and organizations, family, social justice and inequality and anthropology.

Admissions and Requirements

To be accepted to this program, you must have:

  1. Completed coursework

    Students should have completed the majority of their general education courses prior to beginning this program. Request information or call to speak with an adviser about transfer credit or meeting these prerequisites.

  2. Taken the SAT or ACT

  3. Taken the TOEFL or IELTS

    (Only required if English is not your native language)

  4. Official transcripts from all previous schools

  5. Have earned a high school diploma or GED

NOTE: This program is authorized, exempt, or not subject to state regulatory compliance and may enroll students from all 50 states

To apply to this program:

  1. Complete and submit the online application for admissions
  2. Pay the $45 non-refundable application fee

Courses You’ll Take

Core Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
SOC 4900Senior Thesis4
This is a research course designed for sociology majors who are in their senior year.  Each student will develop an original thesis project in this course.  This course meets the UNO general education requirement for a third, upper division writing course.  Students will produce an original thesis based upon material of special interest to them over the course of their major field of study.  Prereq: SOC 1010, 2120, 2130, 3510, and six (6) additional hours of upper division sociology or anthropology courses.  Sociology majors and senior standing.
SOC 3514Research Methods Lab1
This is a laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with SOC 3510.  The focus is on applying methodology and basic analysis learned in SOC 3510 and the development of a sociological research proposal.
SOC 3510Research Methods3
A basic introduction to the principles, methods and techniques of empirical social research. Or SOC 2510
SOC 2134Social Statistics Lab1
The focus is on using computer software to produce and interpret statistical information in the study of social life.
SOC 2120Sociological Theory3
An intellectual history of sociology as an academic discipline surveying outstanding contributions to its body of theory.  The social contexts in which a variety of classical and contemporary theoretical traditions have arisen will be considered.  Stress is placed on understanding and applying different approaches to sociological analysis through detailed textual interpretation of theoretical writings.or SOC 4710/ Prereq: SOC 1010 and Sociology major or permission of instructor.
SOC 1010Introduction to Sociology3
An introduction to the study of human societies. The course presents the fundamental concepts and theories that make up the sociological perspective. These serve as tools for the analysis of social inequality, social institutions and social change.
ANTH 1050Introduction to Anthropology3
Anthropology is the humanistic and scientific study of humans, past and present. This course will present an overview of the four sub disciplines of anthropology: sociocultural, archaeology, biological, and linguistics.
SOC 2130Social Statistics3
Descriptive statistics techniques and the principles of inferential statistical thinking. The emphasis is on the basic statistical techniques employed in analysis of social data. This course does not count as social science credit.  Prereq: MATH 1310

Elective Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
SOC 4200Sociology of the Body3
This course offers an overview of contemporary sociological theories of the body and uses these theories to explore substantive issues pertaining to the discourses, practices, and politics of the body in modern societies. Prereq: SOC 1010 and junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor.
SOC 3900Race & Ethnic Relations in the U.S.3
The course explores historical and contemporary meanings of race and ethnicity and introduces students to the ways sociologists think about race, race relations and racism. It reviews current theoretical issues, and focuses on the recent histories and current position of several major racial-ethnic populations in the U.S.: African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Emphasis is on how race has structured groups' experiences in relation to social institutions like health, education, culture and media, legal system, and the economy.  Prereq: Six hours of social science.
ANTH 4240Medical Anthropology3
Uses a biocultural approach to examine how cultural, environmental, and biological factors interact to influence health and illness in human societies.
SOC 4800Contemporary Topics in Sociology3
This course reviews research and writing in an area which is of current interest in the field of sociology. The specific topic(s) to be covered will be announced at the time the course is being offered. Since the topic will vary, students may elect to take this course more than once.
SOC 3690Social Stratification3
Considers the inequalities of social class, power and status and their relationships to race, ethnicity and gender in order to determine who gets what and why. The consequences of social stratification for life chances, consumption and social mobility are examined.  Prereq: SOC 1010 and sophomore standing.
ANTH 3220Peoples and Cultures of Native North America3
A survey of the native peoples and cultures of North America, past and present. Topics covered include: economics, religion, social organization, kinship, political organization, material culture, gender and culture change through time. Prereq: Sophomore or above with one three-hour introductory social science course, or permission of instructor.
SOC 4130Sociology of Deviant Behavior3
The course explores historical and contemporary meanings of race and ethnicity and introduces students to the ways sociologists think about race, race relations and racism. It reviews current theoretical issues, and focuses on the recent histories and current position of several major racial-ethnic populations in the U.S.: African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Emphasis is on how race has structured groups' experiences in relation to social institutions like health, education, culture and media, legal system, and the economy.  Prereq: Six hours of social science
SOC 3850Society Environment and Resource Conservation3
This course focuses on the sociological analysis of the impacts of economic activities on the bio-physical environment and the people within it, at the national and international levels. Topics include the foundations of environmental sociology, social change, national and international institutions, monitoring pollution prevention and control, the uses of applied sociological techniques, etc. Prereq: Six hours of social sciences, three of which must be in sociology or permission.
SOC 3450Social Psychology3
Social interaction studied in situations of (1) social influences on individuals, (2) dyads or face-to-face groups, and (3) larger social systems. The concepts, theories, data, research methods, and applications of varied substantive topics are examined.  Prereq: SOC 1010 or PSYC 1010
SOC 3820Medical Sociology3
The study of the social patterning of health and illness, including inequalities in health by stratifying elements such as race, class, and gender.  Examines the social definition of health, illness, and the social position of being a sick person in society. Also examines the interaction individuals have with health care providers and the structure of medicine in the U.S. and around the world.  Offers a critical examination on the social institution of medicine. Prereq: SOC 1010 and junior standing; or permission of the instructor.
ANTH 4210Cultural Anthropology3
Art, economics, family, kinship, politics, religion, subsistence, technology, war and world view approached as parts of an integrated whole, a way of life in human society. Illustrations will be drawn from a number of societies, anthropological theories and methods of study. Prereq: Junior or senior with a minimum of six hours of social science or permission of instructor (Cross-listed with ANTH-8216).
ANTH 4920Seminar in Anthropological Problems3
The seminar will cover a specific topic which will be announced each time the course is offered. The students will work with the instructor on projects designed to increase the student's depth of knowledge in specific areas. Prereq: Permission of instructor. (Cross-listed with ANTH-8926)
SOC 3300Sociology of Gender3
This course critically examines the meaning, purpose, and consequences of gender, by using sociological methods and theories to explore the institutions that structure gender relationships and identities, and form the contexts that shape social life in the United States. Particular attention will be given to how social institutions like the state, the economy, family and the mass media shape the definitions of femininity and masculinity, as well as how the gender system intersects with other structures of inequality – race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. Prereq: SOC 1010 and junior standing, or permission of instructor.
SOC 4200Disability and Society3
This course offers an overview of contemporary sociological theories of the body and uses these theories to explore substantive issues pertaining to the discourses, practices, and politics of the body in modern societies. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 and junior standing; or permission of instructor.
SOC 4150American Family Problems3
This course takes up problems and issues of the contemporary American family. Specific topics vary, but might include: family violence; the impact of poverty and racism on families; families and work; gender roles; divorce and its aftermath; remarriage and step-parenthood; family and economy; law and the family; parenting; sexuality, sexual orientation, and reproduction; family policy; drug, alcohol, and mental health problems; and the most basic question of all: what is a family? Family problems and issues are presented in an historical and analytical context which connects the family to basic social institutions and processes.  Prereq: SOC 1010 or 2150

Tuition & Fees

Nebraska Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$259.00
Fees
$52.25
Total
$311.25

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$777.00
Fees
$156.75
Total
$933.75

Out of State Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$452.00
Fees
$52.25
Total
$504.25

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$1356.00
Fees
$156.75
Total
$1512.75
Samantha Ammons, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Samantha Ammons currently teaches Work and Society, Research Methods, Introduction to Sociology and Sociology of Gender. She is interested in the intersection of work, family, gender and organizations.

Application Deadlines
  • Fall SemesterAug 01
  • Spring SemesterDec 01
  • Summer SemesterJun 01
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