Cyber & Cyber Security Law, Executive Certificate

Executive Certificate in Cyber and Cyber Security Law

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

  • Fully Online
  • 8
    Credits
  • $1650.00
    In-State
  • $1650.00
    Out-of-State

Program Overview

The online Cyber and Cyber Security Law, Executive Certificate is designed for practicing attorneys interested in specializing and expanding their expertise in an emerging area.

Cyber law encompasses the regulation of commercial industries and private company data, as well as a vast number of military operations. Cyber law is now virtually required in every law practice as nearly all clients have an online presence.

Students of the Cyber and Cyber Security Law, Executive Certificate gain:

  • Expertise in international law and how it applies to the cyber world
  • Vast knowledge of the relationship of technological and electronic elements to the law
  • Groundwork to be on the cutting edge of cyber regulation and policy

Online students join law classrooms in real-time using Zoom. Class times are generally during the workday and online students participate part-time, for 75% of class sessions, unless obtaining a waiver from the faculty member teaching the course and the program director. The remaining 25% of class time may be viewed via class recordings, giving students flexibility along with a valuable classroom experience.

This certificate is open to those who already have a J.D. or a foreign law degree. Additionally, there is a strong preference for applicants to have a minimum of three years of prior legal experience. Students enrolled in this certificate program, prior to completion of the certificate, may apply to transfer into the LL.M. degree (also listed on this site).

Career Outlook: The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the demand for lawyers is growing at 6%, which is as fast as average. Demand for legal work is expected to continue as individuals, businesses, and all levels of government require legal services in many areas.

This program prepares students to work in a variety of different career sectors. These sectors include the private industry, policy and national security.

Admissions and Requirements

To be accepted to this program, you must have:

  1. A Master's degree

    A Juris Doctorate or foreign law degree is required

NOTE: This program is authorized, exempt, or not subject to state regulatory compliance and may enroll students from all 50 states

Courses You’ll Take

Core Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
LAW 784International Satellite Communications Law1
The branch of space law which is focused most on practical and commercial applications without a doubt is the satellite communications sector. The present class will address the specific legal regimes dealing with satellite communications law in particular at the international level. Thus, it will address the role of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in allocating, allotting and assigning frequency spectrum and orbital slots/orbits, and the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in regulating the international trade in satellite communication services. Also, the unique roles of the international satellite organizations INTELSAT and INMARSAT, especially since their transition to privatized companies kicked off, will be addressed. Finally, other, more regional developments in the USA, Europe and elsewhere will be briefly touched upon. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 724Spectrum Management Law & Policy1
This course provides an overview of the law and policy governing spectrum management in the United States. Broad coverage includes spectrum allocation and domestic assignment, the FCC/NITA jurisdictional split, and Title III of the Communications Act. Specific coverage includes spectrum auctions, the debate over licensed and unlicensed spectrum use, and issues related to licensing satellite spectrum for use in the U.S. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 786/GEuropean Union Law & European Regulation of Space & Telecommunications2
This course deals with two inter-related topics. The first relates to the interaction between the EU and the European Space Agency in particular in the development of European space activities and policies, with due attention to such other players as EUTELSAT and EUMETSAT, up to and including the discussions on their institutional integration. Also the development of such trans-European space projects as Galileo and GMES projects will pass scrutiny. The second deals with the way in which the EU has, since roughly 20 years, started to apply its general legislative and regulatory competencies in the area of the most prominent sector of commercial space which is satellite communications, as a key are within the larger area of telecommunications. Here, the gradual development of an Internal Market for satcom services will provide the focal point. This course is available to online LL.M. students. Pre-requisite: Introduction to European Community Law.
LAW 681/GCyber Law3
This course will explore a range of legal issues in cyber domain, including cyber security, cyber-bullying and online harassment, privacy, network ownership and access, private versus public regulation of cyberspace, speech in cyberspace, content as property and intellectual property in cyberspace, jurisdiction over cyberspace activities, liability of intermediaries, state and local regulation of cyberspace, and the interrelationship between technology and law as mechanisms of regulation. Grades will primarily be based on one final exam. This course is available to online LL.M. students
LAW 756/GInternational Cyber Security: Mischief, Crime & Warfare3
This course examines international legal issues related to emerging conflicts in cyberspace and explores threats to international cyber security posed by a wide range of hostile cyber acts, from damaging cyber mischief and crime to cyber warfare. The primary focus of the course is on the legal frameworks that may apply to hostile acts in cyber space, including the domestic criminal laws of states, international law, and particularly the law of armed conflict. The course compares various forms of cybercrime with state-sponsored efforts to disrupt, deny, degrade or destroy information in computer networks and systems, explores private and governmental roles in cyberspace, and assesses the appropriate legal responses to increasingly diverse state-sponsored military and intelligence operations in cyberspace, including those related to data exploitation, espionage and sabotage. This course is available to online LLM students.

Elective Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
LAW 784International Satellite Communications Law1
The branch of space law which is focused most on practical and commercial applications without a doubt is the satellite communications sector. The present class will address the specific legal regimes dealing with satellite communications law in particular at the international level. Thus, it will address the role of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in allocating, allotting and assigning frequency spectrum and orbital slots/orbits, and the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in regulating the international trade in satellite communication services. Also, the unique roles of the international satellite organizations INTELSAT and INMARSAT, especially since their transition to privatized companies kicked off, will be addressed. Finally, other, more regional developments in the USA, Europe and elsewhere will be briefly touched upon. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 724Spectrum Management Law & Policy1
This course provides an overview of the law and policy governing spectrum management in the United States. Broad coverage includes spectrum allocation and domestic assignment, the FCC/NITA jurisdictional split, and Title III of the Communications Act. Specific coverage includes spectrum auctions, the debate over licensed and unlicensed spectrum use, and issues related to licensing satellite spectrum for use in the U.S. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 786/GEuropean Union Law & European Regulation of Space & Telecommunications2
This course deals with two inter-related topics. The first relates to the interaction between the EU and the European Space Agency in particular in the development of European space activities and policies, with due attention to such other players as EUTELSAT and EUMETSAT, up to and including the discussions on their institutional integration. Also the development of such trans-European space projects as Galileo and GMES projects will pass scrutiny. The second deals with the way in which the EU has, since roughly 20 years, started to apply its general legislative and regulatory competencies in the area of the most prominent sector of commercial space which is satellite communications, as a key are within the larger area of telecommunications. Here, the gradual development of an Internal Market for satcom services will provide the focal point. This course is available to online LL.M. students. Pre-requisite: Introduction to European Community Law.
LAW 681/GCyber Law3
This course will explore a range of legal issues in cyber domain, including cyber security, cyber-bullying and online harassment, privacy, network ownership and access, private versus public regulation of cyberspace, speech in cyberspace, content as property and intellectual property in cyberspace, jurisdiction over cyberspace activities, liability of intermediaries, state and local regulation of cyberspace, and the interrelationship between technology and law as mechanisms of regulation. Grades will primarily be based on one final exam. This course is available to online LL.M. students
LAW 756/GInternational Cyber Security: Mischief, Crime & Warfare3
This course examines international legal issues related to emerging conflicts in cyberspace and explores threats to international cyber security posed by a wide range of hostile cyber acts, from damaging cyber mischief and crime to cyber warfare. The primary focus of the course is on the legal frameworks that may apply to hostile acts in cyber space, including the domestic criminal laws of states, international law, and particularly the law of armed conflict. The course compares various forms of cybercrime with state-sponsored efforts to disrupt, deny, degrade or destroy information in computer networks and systems, explores private and governmental roles in cyberspace, and assesses the appropriate legal responses to increasingly diverse state-sponsored military and intelligence operations in cyberspace, including those related to data exploitation, espionage and sabotage. This course is available to online LLM students.

Other Courses

Course NumberCourse NameCredits
LAW 784International Satellite Communications Law1
The branch of space law which is focused most on practical and commercial applications without a doubt is the satellite communications sector. The present class will address the specific legal regimes dealing with satellite communications law in particular at the international level. Thus, it will address the role of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in allocating, allotting and assigning frequency spectrum and orbital slots/orbits, and the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in regulating the international trade in satellite communication services. Also, the unique roles of the international satellite organizations INTELSAT and INMARSAT, especially since their transition to privatized companies kicked off, will be addressed. Finally, other, more regional developments in the USA, Europe and elsewhere will be briefly touched upon. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 724Spectrum Management Law & Policy1
This course provides an overview of the law and policy governing spectrum management in the United States. Broad coverage includes spectrum allocation and domestic assignment, the FCC/NITA jurisdictional split, and Title III of the Communications Act. Specific coverage includes spectrum auctions, the debate over licensed and unlicensed spectrum use, and issues related to licensing satellite spectrum for use in the U.S. This course is available to online LL.M. students.
LAW 786/GEuropean Union Law & European Regulation of Space & Telecommunications2
This course deals with two inter-related topics. The first relates to the interaction between the EU and the European Space Agency in particular in the development of European space activities and policies, with due attention to such other players as EUTELSAT and EUMETSAT, up to and including the discussions on their institutional integration. Also the development of such trans-European space projects as Galileo and GMES projects will pass scrutiny. The second deals with the way in which the EU has, since roughly 20 years, started to apply its general legislative and regulatory competencies in the area of the most prominent sector of commercial space which is satellite communications, as a key are within the larger area of telecommunications. Here, the gradual development of an Internal Market for satcom services will provide the focal point. This course is available to online LL.M. students. Pre-requisite: Introduction to European Community Law.
LAW 681/GCyber Law3
This course will explore a range of legal issues in cyber domain, including cyber security, cyber-bullying and online harassment, privacy, network ownership and access, private versus public regulation of cyberspace, speech in cyberspace, content as property and intellectual property in cyberspace, jurisdiction over cyberspace activities, liability of intermediaries, state and local regulation of cyberspace, and the interrelationship between technology and law as mechanisms of regulation. Grades will primarily be based on one final exam. This course is available to online LL.M. students
LAW 756/GInternational Cyber Security: Mischief, Crime & Warfare3
This course examines international legal issues related to emerging conflicts in cyberspace and explores threats to international cyber security posed by a wide range of hostile cyber acts, from damaging cyber mischief and crime to cyber warfare. The primary focus of the course is on the legal frameworks that may apply to hostile acts in cyber space, including the domestic criminal laws of states, international law, and particularly the law of armed conflict. The course compares various forms of cybercrime with state-sponsored efforts to disrupt, deny, degrade or destroy information in computer networks and systems, explores private and governmental roles in cyberspace, and assesses the appropriate legal responses to increasingly diverse state-sponsored military and intelligence operations in cyberspace, including those related to data exploitation, espionage and sabotage. This course is available to online LLM students.

Tuition & Fees

Nebraska Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$1650.00
Fees
$201.00
Total
$1851.00

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$4950.00
Fees
$603.00
Total
$5553.00

Out of State Residents

Per Credit Hour

Tuition
$1650.00
Fees
$201.00
Total
$1851.00

3 Credit Hours

Tuition
$4950.00
Fees
$603.00
Total
$5553.00
Justin (Gus) Hurwitz, J.D.
Assistant Professor of Law

Justin Hurwitz's work builds on his background in law, technology and economics to consider the interface between law and technology and the role of regulation in high-tech industries. He has particular expertise in telecommunications law and technology, including data- and cybersecurity, and was recognized as a Cyber Security & Data Privacy Trailblazer by the National Law Journal.

Application Deadlines